Big Tech is often praised for innovation yet the latest updates may end up worsening your productivity overall. Image Credit: G

How Your Productivity Is Killed By Big Tech Updates

Sharif Sourour

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“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

The classic idiom above is wise and well-known, yet it sometimes seems to never be considered by one of the richest and most innovative industries in the world.

In this special feature, you are presented with five case studies: Starting with Microsoft, covering their series of Windows operating systems (OS) plus its latest number 11. We then move on to creative app powerhouse Adobe followed by another world-famous company, maker of the wireless mouse you cannot use while charging — Apple — moving onto entire industries; finding the same concerning patterns in gaming and social media too.

It is true that most technology starts off more rudimentary and less convenient, while development over time increases its power, ease-of-use, aesthetics or even ergonomics. However once a design reaches its peak of functionality, power and elegance, technology companies decide to toss out the old adage; continuing to create new features, new design choices, even reducing key features after necessary.

They often opt for using newer advances in core technology in ways that are less useful for the professional user than older, less advanced nor powerful technology, yet that had gotten all the details right. This gets to a point it becomes no longer worth updating the software nor getting the new device, because it already works great while new solutions do not offer any actual solution besides being new, while sometimes providing a worse experience overall in spite of gimmicky new advances, frills and conveniences that no one ever asked for.

Microsoft — The Pendulum Swinger

The XP Era

After establishing Windows as the definitive successor to DOS; reaching a level of functionality, power and stability was a bumpy road starting with the earliest versions of Windows which would actually have to be run out of DOS, instead of it being the main system, so it had to be loaded as its own application. Eventually it reached a peak point of design and performance at the time culminating in Windows XP. A system so trusted, it took about two decades before Microsoft stopped officially supporting it. Due to constant demand, they only…

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Sharif Sourour

Bboy Shogi (将技) Breaker (since ‘99), Media & Software 日本語でも会話できます。Shogi’s IG: http://instagram.com/bboyshogi/ Battle Series On YT: https://youtube.com/c/SharifS